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Upcoming Events

March 4-19, Eastern NC: Walk To Protect Our People And The Places Where We Live
Join APPPL for a Walk along the NC ACP route. The walk will begin in Northampton County, and end in Richmond County near Hamlet. Details.

The case for public drinking water grows even stronger

By Jenn Weaver, Clean Water for NC

A new report by Food and Water Watch – “The State of Public Water in the United States” – affirms that public water is the most affordable, safe way of providing drinking water to communities. Eighty-seven percent of people in the U.S. with water service receive it from publicly-owned water utilities, and that number is growing. Private, for-profit corporations charge an average of 59% more per year than . . . → Read More: The case for public drinking water grows even stronger

Hear from communities directly impacted by water privatization in CWFNC’s new video!

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be one of the hundreds of thousands of rural and suburban North Carolinians whose basic access to drinking water or sewage treatment is controlled by a private, for-profit corporation? Put yourself in the shoes of a private water or sewer customer, hearing directly from folks in three neighborhoods in the Carolinas about the daily effects on their lives, in Clean Water for NC’s new nine-minute YouTube video.

. . . → Read More: Hear from communities directly impacted by water privatization in CWFNC’s new video!

The Empty Promises of Privatized Wastewater in NC

We often talk about the impacts of drinking water privatization in North Carolina, but did you know that out of state for-profit corporations are also buying up small sewage treatment plants? Utilities Inc. and its subsidiaries have over 19,000 sewer customers in 19 NC counties, and Aqua NC has 12,000 sewer customers in 19 counties. Apart from these two “giants,” there are 70 more private companies operating sewage systems in the state.

Small sewage . . . → Read More: The Empty Promises of Privatized Wastewater in NC

New Branch of ALEC Seeks to Further Erode Local Authority

ALEC money

Asheville and Buncombe County residents stand up for local decisions about the drinking water system

During the last two legislative sessions, North Carolina lawmakers showed an unusual interest in interfering with local government affairs. Among other things, they tried to take away Charlotte’s authority over their own airport, Asheville’s authority over their own water system, and forced Durham to extend water and sewer lines to a private development that was outside of the city’s master . . . → Read More: New Branch of ALEC Seeks to Further Erode Local Authority