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Upcoming Events

Chatham County Board of Commissioners Meeting: Monday, July 17th at 6:00pm. Pittsboro Historic Court House. A public hearing will be held on extending the moratorium on hydraulic fracturing by one year. Chatham residents may also comment on the proposal by emailing lindsay.ray@chathamnc.org.

ACP Public Hearings on Water /Wetland 401 Permits (sign up begins 5:00 pm):
July 18: Fayetteville, 6:00 – 9:00 pm, Fayetteville Technical Community College, Cumberland Hall Auditorium, 2201 Hull Rd.

July 20: Rocky Mount, 6:00 – 9:00 pm, Nash Community College, Brown Auditorium, 522 N. Old Carriage Rd.

GenX, Chemours, and Protecting NC's Drinking Water Supplies

Graphic from “The Intercept,” 2016.

Dozens of articles have been written in recent weeks about the discovery of alarming levels of an unregulated contaminant called “GenX” in the Cape Fear River and in the water supply for a quarter of a million North Carolinians downstream. This situation exemplifies the scale of the drinking water crises our state will face in the future, and the need for concerned residents to stand up for better protections . . . → Read More: GenX, Chemours, and Protecting NC’s Drinking Water Supplies

CWFNC stands with our allies in eastern NC

Princeville in 1999 after Hurricane Floyd (top) and after Hurricane Matthew (bottom). Photos credited to Chris Tyree/Virginia Pilot and Jonathan Drake/Reuters.

The devastation in communities in eastern NC from Hurricane Matthew is historic and overwhelming. We know that many communities – many of them communities of color or low-income communities – are still feeling the worst of the flooding’s effects. For example, Princeville, the oldest U.S. town incorporated by African Americans which was settled . . . → Read More: CWFNC stands with our allies in eastern NC

State reversal on hexavalent chromium in well water an outrage

North Carolinians should be outraged at the recent stunt by the NC Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), to reverse “do not drink” recommendations made by the same agencies last year to private well users near Duke Energy’s coal ash dumps. Initially, DHHS warned residents within 1500 feet of these dumps whose water had more than 0.07 parts per billion hexavalent chromium, a carcinogen when consumed or inhaled, . . . → Read More: State reversal on hexavalent chromium in well water an outrage

Residents denied clean water in Flint; how you can help?

The drinking water crisis in Flint, Michigan has turned into an epidemic of environmental injustices. Flint, a city that is 57% African American, 37% White American, 4% Latino, and 4% mixed race sits about 68 miles northwest of Detroit. Michigan Governor Rick Snyder and President Obama have both declared a state of emergency because of the deadly lead contamination in the drinking water. Flint switched from Detroit’s water system to pulling water from the Flint . . . → Read More: Residents denied clean water in Flint; how you can help?