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Upcoming Events

March 4-19, Eastern NC: Walk To Protect Our People And The Places Where We Live
Join APPPL for a Walk along the NC ACP route. The walk will begin in Northampton County, and end in Richmond County near Hamlet. Details.

Weigh in on closure plans for Riverbend Steam Station: March 16, 6PM (sign up to speak at 5:30PM) at Gaston College, Myers Auditorium, 201 Hwy. U.S. 321, Dallas.

March 26, 9AM-4PM, UNC Asheville: western NC stream volunteer training. RSVP to (828) 357-7411 / Eqilabstaff@gmail.com. $15-20 Donation requested, but not required. View more information.

March 27, 6-8PM, Boone: Water Justice Forum. Sponsored by Department of Sustainable Development and the Sustainability and Environmental Education Club at ASU. Presentations by Dr. Kelsey Pieper, VA Tech, and Katie Hicks, CWFNC. Details.

NC Supreme Court rules in favor of Asheville in water lawsuit

On December 21, 2016, the NC Supreme Court ruled in favor of the City of Asheville in a long-standing dispute over the City’s right to own and operate their water system, overruling a lower court’s decision. (Read the City of Asheville’s statement). This decision recognizes the inherent connection between water utility governance and human health, and denies the NC General Assembly’s attempt to pass local legislation to involuntarily transfer drinking water assets from one entity to another.

MSD meeting

Residents with Save Our Water WNC outside a Metropolitan Sewerage District meeting.

This decision sets a statewide precedent which is good for all local governments who are tasked with responsibly governing vital public resources, assuring them that they will not suddenly lose control of assets they have worked to invest in, and that regional partnerships to provide communities with drinking water come about when local residents support them, not as a result of legislative mandates. CWFNC supports public, locally owned drinking water for many reasons. Local governments are usually responsive to residents’ concerns, knowledgeable about local problems and resources, and accountable to their constituents when it comes time to make an important decision. This cannot be said for private utilities or levels of government that are too far removed from a local community.

Local public interest activist Barry Summers of Save Our Water WNC says “We hope that this puts to rest the notion that the power of the State should be used in this manner. We support and encourage the City of Asheville to reach out to the various political entities of Western North Carolina that have an interest in safe, reliable, locally-controlled drinking water, and find common solutions to whatever areas of friction that may have contributed to this five-year long saga.”

Clean Water for NC is proud to partner with communities to ensure that drinking water remains local and public!

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