• Factory Farms

    In 2019, it came to CWFNC’s attention that poultry operations were spreading across North Carolina at an alarming speed. Our state agencies were not only lax in regulating these facilities, but they did not know where or how many existed. Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are the main, industrialized method of producing animal products in the US. In North Carolina, the swine industry has been a major issue for decades, with organizations such as the North Carolina Environmental Justice Network and Sound Rivers fighting to protect the low-income and minority communities located near these hog operations. The poultry industry raises similar questions regarding the well-being of people and the environment. According to USDA census data, when evenly distributed, the average broiler CAFO in North Carolina sells nearly half a million chickens for meat annually. The waste generated by these millions of animals and spread without measure on nearby land is certainly cause for concern. Neighbors of such operations, often rural, low-income communities, could be living with air quality issues and well water impacts that have yet to be documented in any official manner. Overapplication of animal manure as fertilizer leads to build-ups that runoff or leach into adjacent water sources. Groundwater contamination from CAFOs could negatively be impacting nearby households that depend on private wells for safe drinking water. Surface waters polluted by nutrients have increased algae growth and decreased amounts of dissolved oxygen, eventually leading to dead zones where fish and plants cannot survive. If you believe you or your community is experiencing Water and/or Air pollution from a nearby Poultry Operation, call your region’s Dept. of Environmental Quality office: If they don’t answer or respond, CALL or EMAIL US! Durham Office: 919-401-9600 Asheville Office: 828-251-1291 Asheville Regional Office 2090 U.S. Hwy. 70 Swannanoa, NC 28778 828-296-4500 FAX 828-299-7043 Raleigh Regional Office 3800 Barrett Dr. Raleigh, NC 27611 919-791-4200 FAX 919-571-4718 Wilmington Regional Office 127 Cardinal Drive Extension Wilmington, NC 28405 910-796-7215 FAX 910-350-2004 Fayetteville Regional Office Systel Building, 225 Green St., Suite 714 Fayetteville, NC 28301-5094 910-433-3300 FAX 910-486-0707 Washington Regional Office 943 Washington Square Mall Washington, NC 27889 252-946-6481 FAX 252-975-3716 Winston Salem Regional Office 450 West Hanes Mill Road, Suite 300 Winston-Salem, NC 27105 336-776-9800 / (Fax) 336-776-9797 Mooresville Regional Office 610 East Center Ave. Mooresville, NC 28115 704-663-1699 FAX 704-663-6040 Addressing air and groundwater impacts as well as environmental justice issues related to unregulated poultry operations is CWFNC’s newest project. This page will continue to be updated as the project progresses!


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  • Safe, Affordable Water for All

    CWFNC believes that safe affordable water is a right for all North Carolinians, and we work to organize with communities, research the impacts of water supply privatization and pricing practices, and advocate for health-protective, just and sustainable statewide water quality and allocation policies. Learn more about our work promoting Safe, Affordable Water for all! Water Justice Campaign Well User Protection Your Drinking Water Concerns About Aqua NC? Concerns About Utilities, Inc? Bottled Water


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  • Fracking & Fracked Gas Pipelines

    Hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” is a method of extracting natural gas that involves blasting underground rock thousands of feet into the ground with a cocktail of sand, water and chemicals. Why now in NC? Vast underground reserves called shale basins were long thought impractical to drilling because of their depth. However, “fracking” would allow NC reserves to be processed. Why should YOU be concerned? Documented health risks (6 states with 1000 instances of groundwater contamination). Large amounts of fresh water used and large amounts of wastewater generated with limited disposal options. Inadequately regulated (2005 federal loophole exempting fracking from environmental regulation); spills, regulatory penalties, and litigation linked to fracturing operations have been reported in several states. The Atlantic Coast Pipeline The ACP was approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), in October, 2017, ignoring extensive studies on lack of need for the pipeline and major impact. Since that time, Duke Energy and Dominion Energy proved they were unable to build the unjust, unneeded Atlantic Coast Pipeline without disproportionately impacting Indigenous and African American communities along the route, destroying fragile drinking water sources, and harming endangered species throughout W.V., V.A., and N.C. After years of challenges from the Courts, landowners, impacted communities, and ally organizations, Duke and Dominion CANCELLED their plans for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline on July 6, 2020!!! The cancelling the Atlantic Coast Pipeline is a  victory for justice of many kinds! Environmental Justice, because the African American and Indigenous communities along the pipeline route can breathe easier that this massive project that will not victimize them yet again by disproportionately harming their health, safety, economics and access to their lands.  Climate justice, as the routine emissions of methane from the ACP and the fracked gas it supplied were estimated in our 2019 study to increase climate impacts by as much as 13% over EPA’s estimate of current national methane releases. Economic Justice, as ratepayers of the mega-utilities Duke and Dominion building the pipeline will not face the substantial rate hikes that the unneeded pipeline would have brought. Landowners along the pipeline, many of very modest means, had faced losing control of their lands or long court battles, and can now settle with the rapacious pipeline builders and move on with their lives. Our only disappointment is that our NC Department of Environmental Quality accepted the grossly inadequate Environmental Impact Statement that Dominion and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission foisted on them in 2017, and then granted air and water permits for the ACP that could not protect Environmental Justice for communities,  or the state’s waters and air quality.  We hope that DEQ’s leadership will realize how much of the state agency’s time and resources have been wasted on considering this misguided project,  and that they will become closer partners with Environmental Justice communities and well-informed, scientific and public-spirited non-profits to protect NC communities and the public’s resources for all of us,  even challenging federal “regulators” when they act as industry cheerleaders. We celebrate with the many thousands of impacted residents, and deeply committed activists, organizations, public interest law groups and coalitions that worked relentlessly to defeat this dangerous, costly and unnecessary pipeline. Resolutions against the Atlantic Coast Pipeline Resolution by CWFNC Resolutionby UNC-Pembroke


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  • Coal Ash in NC

    The site in North Carolina where an accident at a coal ash pond spilled tons of coal ash and wastewater into the Dan River Since the February 2014 massive spill of tens of thousands of tons of coal ash and 27 million gallons of contaminated wastewater from a Duke Energy coal ash pit into the Dan River, lawmakers, regulators, the media, and the public have paid more attention to the threat of coal ash waste stored in unlined pits across NC. Clean Water for NC believes the storage and disposal and cleanup of coal ash waste is an environmental justice issue, often impacting communities already suffering impacts from other types of pollution. We are committed to working with these communities to organize for solutions to coal ash injustice. We are an active partner with the statewide Alliance of Carolinians Together Against Coal Ash (ACT Against Coal Ash), a community-led alliance of representatives from communities near coal ash sites and landfills. Together with coal ash impacted communities across the Southeast, ACT hopes to broaden the alliance to stand firm for cleaner air and water, safer conditions for cleanup workers, and improved public health for communities burdened with coal ash pollution. The North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) has secured the excavation of more than 80 million tons of coal ash in North Carolina.   Under a settlement agreement with community and environmental groups and Duke Energy that ends the appeal litigation, Duke Energy will move forward with excavation plans at the Allen, Belews Creek, Cliffside, Marshall, Mayo and Roxboro sites, moving coal ash into on-site lined landfills.  The terms of that agreement were incorporated into a Consent Order entered in court on February 5, 2020. The excavation is the largest coal ash clean up in the nation’s history and will result in more excavation than in four neighboring states combined. Resources about Coal Ash in N.C. Clean Water for NC’s resolution on coal ash (2015) A.C.T. Against Coal Ash website SE Coal Ash’s Interactive map of coal ash sites DEQ Map of Contaminated Drinking Water Well DEQ Coal Ash Closure Plans


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