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Upcoming Events

March 4-19, Eastern NC: Walk To Protect Our People And The Places Where We Live
Join APPPL for a Walk along the NC ACP route. The walk will begin in Northampton County, and end in Richmond County near Hamlet. Details.

Weigh in on closure plans for Riverbend Steam Station: March 16, 6PM (sign up to speak at 5:30PM) at Gaston College, Myers Auditorium, 201 Hwy. U.S. 321, Dallas.

March 26, 9AM-4PM, UNC Asheville: western NC stream volunteer training. RSVP to (828) 357-7411 / Eqilabstaff@gmail.com. $15-20 Donation requested, but not required. View more information.

March 27, 6-8PM, Boone: Water Justice Forum. Sponsored by Department of Sustainable Development and the Sustainability and Environmental Education Club at ASU. Presentations by Dr. Kelsey Pieper, VA Tech, and Katie Hicks, CWFNC. Details.

The time to stand up for Environmental Justice is NOW

Clean Water for North Carolina enthusiastically supports the Principles of Environmental Justice, first established in 1991. The Environmental Justice movement is now international, working to prevent the disproportionate impacts of destructive, economically damaging and toxic operations on communities of color and low income by standing together. Now, after decades of EPA recognition of environmental injustices and commitment to EJ, the progress made is under attack!

The Trump administration has announced plans to cut the EPA’s budget by 25 percent, including dismantling the whole EPA Environmental Justice program! That would include eliminating grant programs that help low income and minority communities to protect themselves against environmental harms. In the face of the administration’s outright hostility to EJ, Mustafa Ali, EPA’s Environmental Justice chief, resigned from his position after 24 years at the agency.

EJ Summit group

CWFNC’s Ericka Faircloth (second from left) at a previous Annual Summit of the NC Environmental Justice network.

It’s more urgent than ever to take action for Environmental Justice in North Carolina! CWFNC is a member of the NC Environmental Justice Network and encourages other organizations and individuals to join and support the network by visiting www.ncejn.org. NCEJN’s Annual Summit, a great opportunity to meet with other communities, takes place in mid-October each year. Watch for an announcement of the next Quarterly Meeting in Sampson County, NC in April, too!

Walk to Protect Our People and the Places we Live (APPPL)

Join us this Saturday at 11:00 am for the kickoff of the “Walk to Protect Our People and the Places we Live,” a walk to raise awareness about the Atlantic Coast Pipeline. Sign up for the Walk here and for more information from APPPL here.

Come hear the struggles of landowners along the proposed route of the ACP, meet local allies, and hear music from Lumbee/Tuscarora singer Charly Lowry.

Meet organizers at least an hour in advance at The Franklinton Center (281 Soundbend Lane, Whitakers) to park, and to catch a free shuttle to the opening ceremony. More info coming soon on other parking options!

This Walk will continue through March 19th in Northampton, Halifax, Nash, Wilson, Johnston, Sampson, Cumberland, Robeson, Scotland, and Richmond Counties. Folks can participate in the Walk on any day/location.

Water, snacks and shuttles will be provided during the entire length of the Walk.​

APPPL Websitehttps://2017acpwalk.org/

Register for Walk herehttps://2017acpwalk.org/register/

Don't miss a chance to Speak Out on Atlantic Coast Pipeline, Feb 13, 14, 15!!

FERC Seeks Comments on Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline

Attend People’s Hearings nearby—learn more about the ACP and help prepare for official comments!

The Atlantic Coast Pipeline’s long permitting process continues, and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), which makes the final certification decision for gas pipelines,  released a Draft Environmental Impact Statement on December 30th. There are MAJOR problems with the long DEIS (click here)!  There’s missing information, serious oversimplifications, poor analysis and startlingly overoptimistic economic and environmental assumptions.

Several local and statewide organizations concerned about the ACP invite you to join us at informal People’s Hearings close to the locations of the official FERC “listening sessions” for brief oral comments.   You can either go first to the FERC listen session closest to you, and then go to the People’s Hearing to get more information and connect with others concerned about the ACP, or you can go first to a People’s Hearing to help prepare your comments.   It’s totally up to you.

The locations for next week’s FERC sessions and People’s Hearings:

Feb 13th, Fayetteville

5:00-9:00PM   FERC Drop- in Comment Session:  DoubleTree Hotel,1965 Cedar Creek Rd.

People’s Hearing: 6:00 PM Rodeway Inn, 1957 Cedar Creek Rd.

 

Feb 14th, Wilson

5:00-9:00PM  FERC Drop- in Comment Session: Forest Hills Middle School 1210 Forest Hill Rd.

People’s Hearing: School cafeteria. Marvin: 252-478-5442 for info.

 

Feb 15th, Roanoke Rapids

5:00-9:00 PM FERC Drop- in Comment Session: Hilton Garden Inn, 111 Carolina Crossroads Pkwy.

People’s Hearing: 5:30 Mystique Events Ctr, 1652  NC Hwy. 125

Call Belinda, 252-537-1078, or Hope@CWFNC.org for more info.

 

Here are some examples of key problems with the DEIS for you to consider commenting on:

Socioeconomic Issues and Environmental Justice

Brief Comments on Groundwater Resources Section 4.3.1

Surface Water Wetlands Summary of Problems

Summary Comments on Compressor Stations and Air Quality

Summary Comments on Inadequate Assessment of Safety Issues in DEIS

NC Supreme Court rules in favor of Asheville in water lawsuit

On December 21, 2016, the NC Supreme Court ruled in favor of the City of Asheville in a long-standing dispute over the City’s right to own and operate their water system, overruling a lower court’s decision. (Read the City of Asheville’s statement). This decision recognizes the inherent connection between water utility governance and human health, and denies the NC General Assembly’s attempt to pass local legislation to involuntarily transfer drinking water assets from one entity to another.

MSD meeting

Residents with Save Our Water WNC outside a Metropolitan Sewerage District meeting.

This decision sets a statewide precedent which is good for all local governments who are tasked with responsibly governing vital public resources, assuring them that they will not suddenly lose control of assets they have worked to invest in, and that regional partnerships to provide communities with drinking water come about when local residents support them, not as a result of legislative mandates. CWFNC supports public, locally owned drinking water for many reasons. Local governments are usually responsive to residents’ concerns, knowledgeable about local problems and resources, and accountable to their constituents when it comes time to make an important decision. This cannot be said for private utilities or levels of government that are too far removed from a local community.

Local public interest activist Barry Summers of Save Our Water WNC says “We hope that this puts to rest the notion that the power of the State should be used in this manner. We support and encourage the City of Asheville to reach out to the various political entities of Western North Carolina that have an interest in safe, reliable, locally-controlled drinking water, and find common solutions to whatever areas of friction that may have contributed to this five-year long saga.”

Clean Water for NC is proud to partner with communities to ensure that drinking water remains local and public!