• Private Well User? Take the Survey to Help Us Help YOU!

    Clean Water for NC is excited to get back on the ground and work to strengthen protections for our state’s 3 million+ well users To help us better understand community needs and concerns, we are inviting all individuals who rely on a private well for their drinking water source to participate in the survey below! The anonymous survey is divided into 2 sections: 1. Your well testing history 2. Potential barriers to testing your well TAKE THE WELL USER SURVEY! **All responses are anonymous and will only be shared with CWFNC staff to better inform their Well User Protection campaign…


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  • ‘Bipartisan’ Infrastructure Plan is a Privatization-Promoting Disaster

    By Food & Water Watch, June 24 2021 Today the White House announced that it had reached a bipartisan infrastructure ‘compromise’ with a group of Senators. The plan would rely on privatization schemes that will undermine public control and prove to be  costly. The proposed financing mechanisms include “public-private partnerships,” “private activity bonds,” and “asset recycling.” Public private partnerships are privatization deals in which a private company takes control over the operation, and sometimes financing, of a public project. Private activity bonds give tax subsidies to debt issued by corporations to finance privatized projects. Asset recycling refers to schemes where a…


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  • Testing Before Real Estate Transfers to Protect Private Well Users!

    It is estimated that over 3 million North Carolinians use private wells for their drinking water, and NC has the fourth highest number of private well users in the country. While there is no statewide database tracking the annual number of real estate transfers in NC, it would not be a stretch to state that tens of thousands of properties are bought or leased annually without the buyer or lessee having any information on the quality of their property’s private well. Because North Carolina law only mandates the testing of private wells that were drilled after…


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  • The International Challenge of World Water Day—March 22nd!

    As Clean Water for NC and all of our members and allies continue to work for Safe, Affordable Water for All in our state, it’s crucial to keep in mind that much of the world lacks the water and wastewater management that we’ve MOSTLY been able to take for granted in the US. The theme of this year’s United Nations World Water Day is “Valuing Water,” calling on individuals and nations to assess the complex multiple values water holds in our lives, health, culture and economies and making decisions to protect, restore and manage it accordingly. A strong focus of…


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  • Environmentalists say Trump’s EPA fell far short in the fight against PFAS

    By: Greg Barnes, Environmental Health News March 9, 2021 On the eve of his last day as president, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under Donald Trump sent out a glowing news release highlighting its numerous efforts to protect people from toxic “forever chemicals.” The news release was the last of many from the EPA that touted the agency’s successes in the waning months of Trump’s presidency. In it, the EPA trumpeted the suite of actions that will “continue the significant progress” it has made to combat per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances — or PFAS — found at elevated levels in drinking water in North…


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  • Thank YOU for Supporting Our Work to Protect Drinking Water for Everyone!

    Clean Water for NC has been working with communities for over 35 years to fight for stronger drinking water protections for all – and we couldn’t do it without your support! Support Our Work! Our Water Justice Campaign organizes customers of private, for-profit water utilities like Aqua NC and Carolina Water Service, to hold these corporations accountable for poor water quality, astronomical rates, and inadequate customer service…


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  • Rural cities and towns struggle to pay for water systems during the pandemic

    By: Kevin Griffin, Hickory Daily Record | N.C. News Collaborative August 7, 2020 This spring, Tyrrell County, with the smallest population in the state, came within 24 hours of defaulting on a bond issued to build one of its water plants. The state stepped in and helped make the payment, but county leaders don’t know how they will make the next one. The county’s biggest water customer, a state prison, closed last fall. Tyrrell County is one of dozens of small, rural governments managing utility systems teetering on bankruptcy. The cost of running an aging water system or paying vendors for…


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  • Are Drinking Water Suppliers Communicating Well with Spanish Speaking Communities?

    READ THE NEW REPORT! North Carolina is home to over 1 million Hispanic or LatinX inhabitants. While it would be incorrect to assume this entire population only speaks Spanish, our findings during our Mobile Home Park drinking water canvas last summer proved that many residents across the state may not be receiving critical health and service information about their drinking water except in English. The US EPA  characterizes a public water system (PWS) as one that “provides water for human consumption through pipes or other constructed conveyances to at least 15…


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  • 21 state attorneys general sue over new Trump water rule

    By: Don Thompson, Associated Press July 21, 2020 Attorneys general in 20 states and the District of Columbia sued the Trump administration on Tuesday, alleging that new federal rules undermine their ability to protect rivers, lakes and streams within their borders. They say that new final rules issued last week by the Environmental Protection Agency alter a practice dating back more than 30 years giving state governments the authority to review, block or put conditions on federally permitted water projects. President Donald Trump in April 2019 issued an executive order directing the change that critics said could make it…


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