• Monitoring Kick-off! Working together to inform the public through Community Science

    This summer, Clean Water for North Carolina is re-engaging our environmental monitoring efforts to prepare for our Community Science programs! Asheville staff Amanda Strawderman and Shelby Cline (pictured below) recently conducted air monitoring and water testing near the Pee Dee River. While on their trip, they caught glimpses of industrial-sized chicken houses (often known as poultry CAFOs or factory farms), dodged poison ivy, met a friendly cat with her four kittens, and managed to gather some data while they were at it. 


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  • Reach Out & Get Involved for Environmental Justice!

    2020 will forever be etched in our minds and hearts, having lost so much and so many to COVID-19. On top of a global pandemic, we witnessed (even participated in) increased awareness of health, racial, and economic justice issues being raised to new heights. If we have learned anything over the past year, it’s that life is precious and delicate, and that it is time for a new normal! We’re getting ready to reopen our offices toward the end of summer and reenter the world of on-the-ground organizing, in…


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  • Tools Series for the Citizen Scientist in Your Community: NC SWAP Tool!

    This Earth Week, learn how to become an environmental expert in your community! In today’s digital world, online tools or web applications are a convenient way for public agencies like the EPA to share information about polluting industries and their potential harm to the environment. For communities, these tools may be particularly useful to combat environmental injustice. By mapping important information about facilities, pollutants, water sources and other publicly available resources, users can gain the knowledge they need to face any challenges in their area. But these applications can also be difficult…


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  • As Pipeline Construction Booms, Citizens Take Inspections Into Their Own Hands

    By: Brittany Patterson, WV Public Broadcasting August 29, 2019 On a recent hot, August weekend, about a dozen citizens spent three days along the route of the Mountain Valley Pipeline. Armed with cameras, smartphones and drones the volunteers traveled portions of the pipeline’s route under construction from Monroe to Doddridge counties. “There was several things that we saw,” said Summers County resident and organic farmer Neal Laferriere. Laferriere organized the three-day “violations blitz.” He said volunteers documented small problems like poorly-maintained erosion controls as well as much larger ones. “Sediment-laden water in one situation was overflowing…


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