• Are Drinking Water Suppliers Communicating Well with Spanish Speaking Communities?

    North Carolina is home to over 1 million Hispanic or LatinX inhabitants. While it would be incorrect to assume this entire population only speaks Spanish, our findings during our Mobile Home Park drinking water canvas last summer proved that many residents across the state may not be receiving critical health and service information about their drinking water except in English.

    The US EPA  characterizes a public water system (PWS) as one that “provides water for human consumption through pipes or other constructed conveyances to at least 15 service connections or serves an average of at least 25 people for at least 60 days a year.” A Community Water System (CWS) provides water to the same population year-round. Public community water systems include municipal, city, and town utilities, as well as private, for-profit utility corporations.

    Noting the large population, almost 10%, of Hispanic people living in North Carolina, we spoke with public community water systems serving large Spanish-speaking communities to understand how they provide critical water quality information to their customers.

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  • United We Grow – Collaboration for Racial Justice & Environmental Justice

    From the sharp rise in unemployment to the global pandemic impacting us all, tuning into the news this year often feels like opening Pandora’s box. This summer, as NC and other states struggled to flatten the COVID-19 curve, calls for systemic social change gained traction. On Memorial Day, George Floyd, a Black man, died while under the knee of a white Minneapolis police officer. His cries of “I can’t breathe” resonated with millions, catalyzing demonstrations throughout the country and world. Floyd’s death, one among many cases of brutality against Black lives, heightened awareness of the longstanding racial injustices prevalent in the US. Confederate statues have been knocked down and police departments scrutinized for their use of deadly force. Yet, these changes alone are not enough to bring justice. Racism has a pervasive, systemic grip on our society, a fact made obvious not only by unjust killings, but through the ongoing environmental injustices faced by the low-income and minority communities that CWFNC aims to work with to protect their rights.

    Spearheaded by people of color in the 1980s, the Environmental Justice (EJ) movement is often regarded as a response to white, mainstream and elite environmentalism. EJ activists continue to bring attention to the unequal distribution of pollution in the US. A prime example of this discrimination is the recently cancelled Atlantic Coast Pipeline, which was set to cross through many Black, Indigenous, and poor communities in West Virginia, Virginia, and nearly 190 miles of eastern North Carolina.

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  • Duke, Dominion Cancel Plans for Unjust Atlantic Coast Pipeline

    We celebrate with the many thousands of impacted residents, and deeply committed activists, organizations, public interest law groups and coalitions that worked relentlessly to defeat this dangerous, costly and unnecessary pipeline.

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  • Robeson County is NOT a Sacrifice Zone – Go Home, Active Energy! 

    We cannot allow Active Energy to use the communities of Robeson County as a sacrifice zone for a highly experimental product that will benefit international interests and produce unknown community and environmental health impacts.

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  • Keeping an Eye on the impacts of Factory Farms

    CWFNC’s newest project addresses the under-regulated poultry industry and its threat to drinking water and community health. Poultry operations are spreading across the state at an alarming speed, while our […]

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  • Hearings are Virtually Meaningless—But Speak Up For Communities!

    Right now, Americans are dealing with the day to day realities of a global pandemic. This is not the time to be burdened by worries about increased pollution that could […]

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  • Stopping Rate Hikes for Duke Energy’s Dirty Energy & Climate-Busting Plans!

    Rate cases for both Duke Energy Carolinas (DEC) and Duke Energy Progress (DEP) are currently underway, with Duke seeking to recover costs associated with coal ash cleanup, upgrades to their fracked gas infrastructure and costly “grid modernization,” with no clear benefits to customers or cleaner energy. Impacts of the proposed rates would hit hard, as DEC wants to raise electric rates by at least 6.7%–increasing annual electricity bills for an average customer by over $100, while DEP is proposing to raise rates by at least 14.3%, adding over $200 annually to an average electric bill.

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  • Consumers shouldn’t pay cleanup costs for coal ash dumping

    Impacted community members and environmental justice activists won a huge victory earlier this month when the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality, community groups and Duke Energy signed a settlement agreement requiring the utility giant to fully excavate 80 million tons of coal ash from leaking, unlined pits in six sites across the state.

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  • NEW REPORT: Working Towards Water Justice in North Carolina Mobile Home Parks

    This summer, we worked with our Duke University Stanback intern, Elizabeth Allen, to conduct  a “listening canvas,” reaching over 100 mobile home park communities in 9 counties to learn whether and where advocacy was needed  to protect residents’ right to drinking water. Our outreach uncovered concerning patterns regarding landord disputes and drinking water access and quality.

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  • Presentations from 35th Annual Meeting Celebration!

    Thanks to all those who attended our 35th Anniversary Celebration at this year’s Annual Meeting! Click on the links to view the presentations from our amazing speakers!

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  • Celebrating 35 Years of Working with NC Communities!

    Join us in celebration of 35 years of working together! Sept. 21, 1:30 – 5:00 PM The Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman Avenue, Asheville Register on our Eventbrite Page! Clean Water […]

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  • Standing Together Against Coal Ash Injustice

    The news was announced on April Fools Day, but it was no joke! DEQ (The NC Dept. of Environmental Quality), backed by strong science, stood with coal ash communities in their decision to order Duke Energy to excavate coal ash from every remaining site in the state and move it into lined landfills. Duke Energy wasted no time in rebuking DEQ, speaking scathingly about the ordered clean-up, and leveraging its power to safeguard its own interests, but NC residents, businesses, and organizations, will not be standing down.

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  • Victory for Coal Ash Communities Across NC!

    You did it! You spoke out against injustice, and won! On April 1st, DEQ announced that communities across North Carolina will have toxic coal ash removed from unlined, leaking pits […]

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